Friday, 7 July 2017

The Power of a Praying Parent: Book Review


It's my fist post in a long time! Things have been pretty busy. We had our family summer vacation in June, and shortly after that I came down with shingles -- I know, shingles at 30 years old!?

Thankfully, that's behind me. And today I finished one of the books I've been reading for the past few months -- The Power of a Praying Parent by Stormie Omartian. Back in early April, I reviewed one of her other books: The Power of a Praying Wife. I was impressed with it, and gave it a 4.5/5. How does this one stack up? Read on and see my rating at the end of the post.

What did I think of this book, in general? I liked this book. I didn't love it, like I did the wife book. But it was still good. Omartian is heavy on the whole "the Devil is out to get your children and it's a constant onslaught of dark forces" and that's a little much for me. I don't contend with the fact that Satan is real and he does have power in this world, and uses worldly situations to gain control of people's lives. I just don't really like fear-mongering. We should be praying for our children out of an overflowing love for them -- a love that wants to see the best for them. Is part of this fear? Sure. I mean, which one of us doesn't worry about our children, or feel anxious when we look at the world we are raising children in? But fear, for me, should't be the focus. Perhaps it's because I spent many years of my life battling anxiety, but I prefer to come at things from a different approach. I believe God has a plan for everyone, my children included, but praying for them is something important I can do for them to help them spiritually -- like bringing them to Mass, having them baptized, and when the time comes, enrolling them in catechism. I love my kids, and I want the best for them. I also know that prayer is powerful and real, so of course I pray for them.

What I did really like about this book was that it got very specific about how we can pray for the different aspects of our children's lives. So many times I pray, and I feel overwhelmed by all that I have to pray about. We know that the Spirit prays for us when we can't find the words, but it's always good to pray as much as we can and bring everything to God. There are many things that parents of young children don't think about -- but this book encourages the reader to lay a firm foundation of prayer, including praying for/against/about things that are many years into the future.

Is this a good book for Catholic parents? I feel like this book, like her other books, is quite distinctly Fundamentalist Christian. There are things that go against Church teachings -- things like assurance of salvation. But this is not a theological book. If a Catholic is firm in their faith and knowledge of the Scriptures and Church teaching, I see no problem with them reading this book for insight on how to become a better prayer warrior for their children.

How much work is required for this book? Not a lot. It's not a Bible study. You read a chapter, you pray. And repeat. You can take it further, if you want. I took notes on every chapter, and then when I finished the book I crafted a large "master" prayer for my children that covers everything in the book. Or, you could write out each prayer (or buy the prayer-only version of the book) and say one a day.

Overall score: 3.5/5. It's a worthwhile read, but heavy on some fear tactics.

Until next time, happy reading! May God bless you with a safe, happy and restful summer.

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